HOLD THE CANADIAN BACON

As one who believes that clergy should not weigh in on the partial government shut-down, I was intrigued by a news article that I came across last week concerning the current situation or crises, depending on your political views. Canadian Air Traffic Controllers have been sending hundreds of Pizzas to their American counterparts, who have been working without pay for over a month. They refer to it as a show of solidarity; I see it as a gesture of mentschlechkeit. Thanks to this gesture of mentschlechkeit, Air Traffic Controllers in Ronkonkama, Long Island received pizzas, compliments of their counterparts in Gander Newfoundland and Moncton, New Brunswick. Similarly, Air Traffic Controllers in Anchorage, Alaska enjoyed piping hot pizzas courtesy of their neighbors to the south-east in Edmonton, Alberta. Regardless of the amount of oregano and tomato sauce, the two main ingredients of these pizzas are empathy and concern.

This gesture on the part of Canadian Air Traffic Controllers isn’t really about pizzas after all. This gesture on the part of Canadian Air Traffic Controllers flies in the face of the vast majority in our society, who are oblivious to the fact that other people have feelings and because of those feelings, people have every right to feel upset, angry, dejected. Because of their gift of pizza,    Canadian Air Traffic Controllers have unknowingly passed along a much-needed recipe involving human behavior.

There is  a Hasidic tale told about two Polish peasants drinking together at tavern. Wojciech turns to his buddy Stacz and asks: “Stacz, do you love me”?
Stash replies, “Wojciech! The devil take you! We’ve been friends since we were young boys. We have been through so much together. Wojciech! I love you like a brother”!
Stacz and Wojciech return to their vodka. A moment or two later Wojciech asks, “Stacz, do you know what causes Wojciech pain?”
Stacz thinks for a moment and answers “How in the world, should Stacz know what causes Wojciech pain”?
At that point  Wojciech roars, “ Stacz! If you don’t know what causes Wojciech pain, how can you say you love me”?

Unlike, the Hasidic tale of Stacz and Wojciech, our culture has unfortunately conditioned us to approach those who are hurting with meaningless questions and vacuous comments such as: “I simply don’t understand why you feel the way you do” or “why are you so upset”?

I doubt very much if Canadian Air Controllers or Air Controllers in any country for that matter, have ever heard the Hasidic tale about Wojciech and Stash. They didn’t have to. It was imbued in them. The aim of the Canadian Air Controllers who took it upon themselves to send pizzas, wasn’t to analyze or assess. The aim of the Canadian Air Controllers was to tell their American counterparts “we care about you and by no means are we oblivious to what you are going through”. And they did so, ever so tastefully.

Canadian Air Traffic Controllers like all Air Controllers (hopefully) are top notch when it comes to providing necessary headings to those at 37,000 feet, but in no way are their heads in the clouds. They seem to realize  that unless they are prepared to ask how they can be of assistance – financially or otherwise – they would do well not to ask at all!  Instead, they chose to send a much-needed hug, that typically measures 16 inches in diameter , provides 8 slices and is available with an assortment of toppings!

May HaShem continue to bless these Air Traffic Controllers  with clarity of judgement, so that they are able to instruct as far as headings, descent and climbing. May HaShem continue to bless these Air Traffic Controllers with healthy hearts, so that they are able to cause the spirits of other Air Traffic Controllers to soar!

KRISTALLNACHT, A WINDOW TO OUR EXISTENCE

Kristallnacht (the night of shattered glass) ought to take on greater significance this year. Not just because this Friday and Shabbos  mark the 80th anniversary of what Adolph Hitler hoped to be “the beginning of the end” for Jews of Europe, but it brings with it a powerful message to each and every one of us, especially the “oy vey” Jews who, as a result of a lone lunatic in Pennsylvania, are all of a sudden beginning to question their physical safety at synagogue services.

Numbers aside (close to 100 Jews were murdered, while windows were shattered and buildings, including synagogues were set ablaze), Kristallnacht serves as a stark reminder that not only did the German government not protect the Jews, but it was Nazi officials themselves, who ordered German police officers and firemen to do nothing as the riots raged and buildings burned. Unless  blazes threatened Aryan-owned property, firefighters were forbidden to extinguish any flames. Yet, here in this country, immediately following the disaster in Pittsburgh, community-wide programs were held, including one here in Dallas, where the Chief of Police spoke, and a letter of support was read from the Mayor. A cogent argument can be made that random acts of mayhem and carnage notwithstanding, Jews living in the United States of America ought to feel more secure than Jews living in any other country, outside of Israel.

The flames of Kristallnacht shed light on yet another catastrophe that was very much evident in Germany. Whether out of zeitgeist or fear, many non-Jewish Germans either stood idly by, as the wanton destruction took place or cheered the frenzied mobs on, as those mobs wreaked havoc on synagogues as well as stores and homes owned by Jews. While I can only speak for Dallas, the outpouring of support and solidarity from non-Jewish friend and stranger alike, has been most heartening. For far too long throughout our history, when confronted by the deadly deed and venom of the anti-Semite, we Jews knew only too well, that we had no one to turn to but ourselves. Yet, within these last two weeks, it was the outside world who turned to us! I, for one, cannot help but feel that it is so very unfortunate, that we Jews do not show greater appreciation to this outpouring of solidarity.

Close to three decades ago, Reuven Bulka, Rabbi Emeritus of Congregation Machzikei Hadas in Ottawa, Canada, published a book about misconceptions of Jewish life. One misconception concerns the breaking of the glass at a Jewish wedding. According to Rabbi Bulka, there is no connection between the breaking of the glass under the chuppah and the destruction of the holy Temple in Jerusalem. Rather, the breaking of the glass finds its origin in the Talmud, where a rabbi, an invited guest at a wedding, deliberately threw his glass at the wall, thereby shattering that glass, in an effort to temper the level of joy that had gotten out of hand. I should like to add yet another reason for the breaking of the glass under the chuppah.

Eighty years ago, in Germany, the breaking of glass signified destruction of a past, hatred of others and lives in turmoil. Under the chuppah, the breaking of the glass represents the exact opposite. Under the chuppah, the breaking of the glass represents building a future, love of each other, and a life of harmony.

Rabbi Yehudah ben Teima, a rabbinic sage who lived at the time of the Bar Kochba revolt (135 C.E.) reminds us that 80 is synonymous with strength. Let’s draw strength, knowing that we live in a country where the government protects Jews. Let’s draw strength, knowing that we live in a society where non-Jews are genuinely concerned about us and Israel. Let’s draw strength, knowing  that we are part of a tradition where, provided it is done under the chuppah, the shattering of glass is among the most beautiful sounds we ever hear.