THE ORIGINAL ROCKY MOUNTAIN

There is a not so well-known midrash that tells us when Moses was preparing to ascend Mount Sinai to receive the two stone tablets upon which were engraved the Ten Commandments, various pathways leading to the summit began to quarrel with one another. Each pathway vied for the honor of providing Moses a conduit up the mountain; each pathway offered features that the other pathways could not. One touted being the most direct, while another claimed it was the smoothest path to take. Yet a third, claimed that it offered the least steep climb.

There was the one pathway, however, that did not join in the fray. It felt that it had nothing to offer Moses, in that along the entire way up the mountain, it was strewn with rocks. Predictably, it was the rocky path rather than the other better suited paths that was chosen by Moses. Had Moses known that in time to come there would arise a language called English, his choice of pathways leading up the mountain would have been chosen with even more alacrity.

It would have been phenomenal had Moses been able to say that his climb up Mt. Sinai would be the beginning of a wonderful relationship. Moses’ experience with the Children of Israel, however, told him otherwise. Even though the odyssey from Egypt, along with liberation from enslavement, was barely in its seventh week Moses already understood only too well the attitude and temperament of the Children of Israel. To label those who followed Moses out of Egypt as ingrates would not even begin to do justice to the masses, who were incapable of returning gratitude and loyalty for a new lease on life. Even if Moses was not the greatest prophet in Israel, as we find in the song of praise “Yigdal,” he was nevertheless right on target for following a rocky path all the up Mt. Sinai. For Moses instinctively knew that the relationship HaShem would have to endure over time with His chosen people would be a rocky one.

It’s been close to half a century since the term “Rocky Mountain High” was first introduced to American culture. Truth be told, given Moses’ choice of pathways,  the first Rocky Mountain high was experienced over three millennia earlier: “And they (the Children of Israel) encamped there, opposite the mountain” (Exodus 19:2). What made the scenario all the more breathtaking was that this was the first, and unfortunately perhaps the last time as well, that the Children of Israel would be united in commitment and spirit. Given that as a people the Children of Israel have historically been known for their acrimony, rather than their harmony, it is safe to say that both HaShem and Moses, His servant, experienced a “Rocky Mountain High,” as they looked down at the masses at the foot of the mountain.

George and Ira Gershwin May have been on to something, despite employing the wrong possessive pronoun, in their joint effort classic. (George composed the music and Ira wrote the lyrics  to “Our Love is Here to Stay,” as a tribute to his brother who had just died). The Rockies have yet to tumble, neither has Mount Sinai with its rocky pathway to the top. But it is “My love,” says HaShem, “that is here to stay.” And that love has been here to stay from the time Moses ascended that rocky pathway leading to the top until this very moment.

Mount Sinai has been known by a number of names over the years:  Har HaElokim,  Har Bashan,  Har Givnunim and Har Horev. Perhaps there is room for yet another name for this earth-shaking, historic mountain. Taking into account HaShem’s immutable love for us, bearing in mind the “Rocky Mountain High” that HaShem and Moses experienced seeing a united people, and considering the rocky relationship that has existed since Moses first received the Torah, perhaps  Mount Sinai that has every right to call itself the original Rocky Mountain.