FIREWORKS

Not that it’s a contest, but when it comes to fireworks, the outside world doesn’t hold a candle – Roman or otherwise, to us. As Jews, we are the world champion of fireworks. Realize, if you will, that 70 candles are lit annually in Jewish households where festivals and holidays are observed. That’s in addition to yahrzeit candles, Havdalah candles, Shiva candles (G-d forbid,) and Shabbat candles. But it’s more than just numbers! Fireworks are designed to light up the skies. Candles in Jewish homes are designed to light up our lives.

With the exception of one middle letter, the Hebrew word for fire, eish, and the Hebrew word for human, ish, are identical. As far as Judaism is concerned, it is more than mere coincidence. Fire can only exist in a medium where there is both fuel and oxygen. Take away either the fuel or the oxygen and the fire will quickly die out. The very same holds true for humans. Humans also require fuel and oxygen. Take away either the fuel (food) or the oxygen and the human will ultimately die. Judaism, however, goes even one step further when it comes to humans. Aside from food and air, Judaism understands the two necessary components for survival as metaphors for physicality and spirituality. For a healthy life, both are necessary. This is why Judaism looks at the flame of a candle and sees it reaching high, as though it were clamoring for spirituality, only to be reminded that it must remain anchored to the candle, its source of fuel representing the material world.

Fireworks not only light up the skies, but they do so with resplendent colors. Come July 4th of each year, the night skies are sprayed with a panoply of colors that might well cause artists to sit up and take notice. In this realm, Judaism cannot compete, nor does it have any desire to do so. The flames that have served to illuminate Jewish homes over the millennia are comprised of colors that are basic and simple – orange/yellow and blue/black. Whether the flames celebrate a miraculous event (Chanukah) or a heartbreaking event (Shiva,) Judaism reminds us that life – a healthy, normal life – is a combination of dark days represented by the blue/black hue and bright days represented by the orange/yellow hue. Judaism also reminds us that a healthy, normal life is one that is no different than the typical flame; the orange/yellow bright days will far outshine the blue/black dark days.

Last but not least, fireworks are bedazzling. The intricate designs that streak across the horizon, resulting from engineered ingredients within every candle, Roman or otherwise, explain why Americans set aside time and make it a point to watch the fireworks displays. Jewish “fireworks” are limited to one design. Most dismiss Jewish “fireworks” as a mere flame.  Precious few realize that that flame shape and tear shape are one and of the same. And with good reason! Just as Judaism recognizes two primary colors of flames, so too does Judaism recognize two different types of tears. There are tears of sadness; there are tears of joy. While I doubt any studies have been made or any polls taken, I can’t help but wonder which candles are lit, if any, in greater number in Jewish homes, yahrzeit candles or Shabbat/festival candles. I pray that it is the latter. In life, there will always be tears. G-d willing, the tears of joy will far outnumber the tears of sadness.

In all likelihood, the fireworks celebrating July 4th leave a special impression. I hope the fireworks celebrating the Jewish calendar as well as Jewish life-cycle events will do the very same, if not more.

 

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT

I very much doubt that many, if any, rabbis have ever used Yom Kippur to speak about capital punishment. With the exception of the fifth and final prayer of the day – Neilah – mention is made in every Yom Kippur service of four different types of capital punishment administered by the (human) court: stoning, burning, beheading and strangulation. Given last week’s flurry of executions in neighboring Arkansas (Governor Asa Hutchinson signed orders for eight executions to take place within a time period of eleven days) perhaps it’s time to take a look at the death penalty from the perspective of Judaism.

In theory, Judaism does not shy away from discussing any number of situations where the death penalty is warranted. In theory, Judaism does not shy away from discussing how the death penalty is to be carried out. In practice, however, the death penalty occupies a totally different position amongst our people. It’s as though Jews and Judaism are of totally different philosophies concerning the death penalty. While Judaism (certainly from a Biblical and Talmudic point of view) appears to be very much in favor of capital punishment, Jews make it extremely difficult, if not impossible, to implement it. Below are three reasons why I believe Judaism supports capital punishment in theory:

Jewish society is  predicated upon justice. When HaShem confides in Abraham that He is about to destroy the twin cities of Sodom and Gomorrah because of the rampant evil and the wanton wickedness, Abraham mounts an excellent argument where he confronts HaShem: “Shall the judge of the earth not do justice?” Sweeping the innocent away with the guilty is not justice. Permitting a willful murderer of an innocent individual to live out the days of his natural life is also not justice. Because Judaism values innocent life so very highly, it sees capital punishment as the highest form of justice in dealing with a murderer.

Judaism simply cannot tolerate the taking of an innocent life. To express its anger and to vent its outrage, Judaism goes to great lengths to warn the would be perpetrator or murderer what lies in store.  Whether such a warning instills fear or serves as a deterrent is open to debate. In all likelihood, it does not.  What such a warning does do however, is provide a catharsis for a society and culture that values and even cherishes innocent human life.

I have never been to an execution, much less served as a chaplain to the condemned prisoner, but  speaking in the name of Judaism, I cannot help but feel that, regardless of the prisoner’s religious faith or lack thereof, Job 1:21 ought to be read: … “HaShem has given and HaShem has taken away.” Just as HaShem places innocent beings into this world (what could be more innocent than a newborn?), so too does HaShem (and only HaShem) have the right to take innocent human beings (those who cause no imminent physical threat to others) from this world. According to Judaism, just as Adam and Eve forfeited their world by overstepping their G-d given boundaries, so too according to Judaism has a murderer of an innocent human forfeited his or her G-d given boundaries.  How Jews and non-Jews choose to understand, interpret or react to this is of course an entirely different story.

It would be interesting to observe the reactions of both the proponents, as well as the opponents of capital punishment, if a completely freak, fatal accident were to occur to a murderer who was spared the death penalty by our judicial system.

ACCEPT ME FOR WHAT I AM

Every so often, a new prayer book or High Holiday Machzor makes a debut. As leader of a congregation who replaced a tried and true High Machzor a few years ago, far be it from me to speak out against new texts. What I do take issue with however, is the reason for the change.
Reform, Conservative and Orthodox movements have been known to come out with new Siddurim and Machzorim because they feel that the Siddurim and Machzorim they have been using up until now no longer “speak” to their members. Is it possible that the exact opposite is the case? Perhaps the Siddurim and Machzorim they have been using up until now “speak” to their members loud and clear. It’s just that the members of Reform, Conservative or Orthodox Judaism have suddenly become uncomfortable with the message. And so, the message is rewritten.
Rephrasing a quote that Cesar A. Cruz once made about art, it can be said that “religion should comfort the disturbed and disturb the comfortable”. While I’m no psychologist, I can’t help but feel that the vast majority of those who attend religious services would only agree with the first half of this aphorism. Put differently, the vast majority of congregants or parishioners look to religion as well as religious services along with the texts that are part and parcel of those service to rubber stamp their behavior and lifestyle…. if they look at all. It seems that while it is the G-d given right of those who attend religious services to change the message conveyed by their House of Worship either through clergy or text, it also appears to be true that G-d help the clergy or text that seeks to change those who attend those very same religious services!
When it comes to religion, there is a great irony in today’s society. On the one hand, there are untold numbers throughout our culture who espouse “accept me for who I am”. Yet, when it comes to reciprocity on their parts, particularly when it comes to religion in this country, the notion of accepting the church or synagogue for what it is, seems to suddenly disappear.
Isn’t it strange, that Americans who are conditioned to “telling it like it is” and demand from others to “give it to them straight”, suddenly change the rules when it comes to church or synagogue attendance? Maybe I’ve had it wrong all these years, but I was always under the impression that the very purpose of September 13th through September 23rd of this year is to show that what makes us humans is our ability to change and improve our habits as well as our behavior.
Something to think about these High Holy Days… And beyond.